Standards

De facto and de jure

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Abstract

Standards can be developed in two ways: (a) Development by an official standardisation body, like the International Standardization Organisation (ISO, 2002) or Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers, Inc (IEEE, 2003); or (b) Development of the standard without the help of a standardization body. The success of the standard can be measured by how many people use the standard

Standards can be developed in two ways: (a) Development by an official standardisation body, like the International Standardization Organisation (ISO, 2002[1]) or Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers, Inc (IEEE, 2003[2]); or (b) Development of the standard without the help of a standardization body. The success of the standard can be measured by how many people use the standard. If a standard is used by the industry but not officially approved (yet) then it is called a “de facto” standard. A standardisation body has several committees working on creating different specifications for standards in all kinds of fields. The standardization bodies use several stages of adaptation before a standard reaches an official “de jure” status. “De jure” literally means ‘legally’ and is used for standards that are recognised by official standards bodies such as ISO and IEEE. For example, the IEEE uses the following stages for developing a new standard. PAR stands for Project Authorization Request:

 
  • Idea for standard
  • Find sposor
  • Submit PAR
  • Organize working groep
  • Develop draft standard
  • Process mandatory coordination
  • Ballot draft standard
  • Appove draft standard
  • Publish approved standard
The standards development process (IEEE, 2003[2])